I'd say mic'ing kick, snare, hihat, toms and overheads seperately is a pretty standard thing these days. The next two mic’s are used as overhead microphones. In this guide we’ll look at some of the best mics for recording drums whether studio or stage. In this article, we are going to cover techniques used for recording drums with 1 mic, 2 mics, 3 mics, 4 mics, 7 mics, and what to do if you have more mics than drums and want to do something like 32 […] Thanks to all. Does the high hat get a seperate mic and how about the toms? You want to convey that with the overheads and a room mic. Gotta mic the kick! Hey there! I have thought about bringing someone in to assist so that is totally cool that you suggested that mifipie. Overhead/Room Mics. 15 mics. "Kick , snare and a pair" is probably the optimum choice for a raw blues sound, but if you're recording to a DAW, tracks are free. Blues is all about the feel. 3 Kick Two inside one dynamic one condenser, one outside. Start with an amazing drums set, above all else, get the greatest drum sound before you even think about where a mic is going to go. It's better to have tracks you don't need than to get to the mix and wish you had something you didn't record. It will explore 2-mic setups, 3- and 4-mic setups, and close mic techniques to ensure that your drums are captured as they sound. I never mic the Hi-Hat. You can also position mics as far away from the drums as possible, given the size of the room you’re recording in. 1. I have had good results with a 4 mic set up like you described. IE: Are you on carpet, hard floor, in the corner (where bass response is often times accentuated) WHERE IS THIS KIT? Mic positioning 12. Kick, snare, 2 overheads, toms. kick, snare & 2 overheads is a popular configuration around here. Last kit I mic'ed was a 4 piece. If you are recording in a smaller, not so nice sounding room, a single ambient or room mic set a few feet away from the kit can also be used to create artificial ambience using reverb, but more of that later. Then add whatever else you feel is needed... How many mics to use on drums just depends on the room, the drum kit, the drummer and the style of music you are recording. I know it is not your question but you already received enough answers, I must warn you that it is almost impossible to record a good drum sound in a small room (i.e bedroom, 2 car garage...) especially if it is square, low ceiling and untreated surfaces. Ive got great results with 3 mics for some stuff but I've had over 30 up on kits before now - obviously different kits and different desired results. It also depends on how dynamic the drummer is. If you are in a fairly small room, have decent drummer, and a kit that sounds good, then I think 12 mics is way overkill (but some people use that many and more). With not much experience, you should try to use as few mics as possible. I have to agree with Glenn that an experienced pro in this area might be a very good call for your project. If in doubt, mic everything separately and when mixing start with the OH and kick mics. Or if you’re in a smaller room, you can put dynamic mics in the corners, pointing away from the kit, or figure-8 mics in the corners with the drum kit sitting in the nulls (90 degrees off-axis) to create a bigger room sound. The loud sound bounces back and it always sound horribly boxy whatever you do with the mics. If you are in a fairly small room, have decent drummer, and a kit that sounds good, then I think 12 mics is way overkill (but some people use that many and more). IF he is a good drummer and you don't have enough mics the do the recorder man method. Then make sure your in a good room, or a good part of the room that compliments the drum sound. What is the normal mic setup for drums? My advise is to get the best, most natural sound with the overheads first. Does the high hat get a seperate mic and how about the toms? Especially so for the Sennheiser, which you can see wired up to many professional stage and studio drum recordings. If you only have two channels to record an entire kit… The two mics you undoubtedly use are a pair of overhead/room mics … Since their purpose is to provide a balanced stereo image of the drum kit as-a-whole. I'm figuring kick, snare, 2 overheads and then I start wondering. But I do put spots on the toms. A pair of LDCs, spaced 90 degrees apart from the drum center, works well. But if you’ve got two mics to spare for a room setup, combining a far away, mid-side-configured pair with a mono overhead also makes for some very interesting contrasts. How many mics to use on drums just depends on the room, the drum kit, the drummer and the style of music you are recording. Once you get a nice balance of the entire drum kit then move on to the kick and snare. The first dynamic microphone is placed 6-to-12 inches from the resonance head of the kick drum. The Glyn Johns technique uses only FOUR microphones for capturing a full drum kit. Good luck! I would also use a FOK mic. For a simple traditional blues vibe and a good/kit/room/player: If you're inexperienced, I'd definitely go with the 12 track list. I always use sampled drums in the music I do but an artist has asked me to record his band and so live drums. A lot of the really classic drum tracks that people worship, such as Bonham/Led Zeppelin, used only 3-4 mics and not something like 12. run a search, there are many schools of thought on this topic. The standard choice for room mics is a matched pair of condenser mics (either large or small). Too many drum mics, especially in a small and reflective room, can easily create phase problems and make the kit sound smaller rather than larger. What is the minimum amount of mics needed for a great drum recording? Whether it’s Glyn Johns, Recorderman, or any other combination of close and room mic techniques, I want to make sure that you have the information that I needed decades ago. Kick, snare, and 2 over. Cover all the bases so you can solve more problems while mixing, and consider getting some assistance on the session. blues band...normal mic setup for drums? The way pros go around the bad room problem is to use drum replacement. Room miking front: a large condenser mic in front of your kit is a logical place to start. I’ve even it seen using three but for today, we’ll use four. Just a friendly reminder that political discussion, (including "offhand" and 'sideways' commenting) is. Quick answer: the AKG C414 XLS condenser microphone and the Sennheiser MD 421 II dynamic microphones may be all that you need for general drum recording. That would be a great place to start. Thanks in advance. If I’m going stereo for drum overheads, I’ll likely stay mono for my room mic so that the overheads and room mic sounds don’t step on one another’s toes aurally too much in the mix. Pictures Of Mic'ed Up Drum Kits In The Studio. FYI. When you buy products through links across our site, we may earn an affiliate commission. Thanks in advance. I'm figuring kick, snare, 2 overheads and then I start wondering. I'm going to recording a blues band next month.

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